Barbel Fishing World

Go Back   Barbel Fishing World Forums > Message Boards > Barbel Talk

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 29-07-2017, 11:49
Dave Taylor's Avatar
Dave Taylor Dave Taylor is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: West Parley
Posts: 1,457
Default

Most of the suspended algae I've witnessed in our eutrophic uk rivers tend to be brownish in colour, ... there are umpteen species though. They just require some warmth, light and nutrients, like most instream plants. Besides the water turbidity they can create which in turn may reduce desirable crowfoots etc,.. they will also reduce available dissolved oxygen to other inhabitants.
By overloading the biomass with nutrients we create a perfect environment for them throughout the warmer months especially when coupled with low flows.

https://www.gov.uk/government/public...english-rivers

The link is long I'm afraid, and doesn't seem to mention abstraction which obviously further reduces levels.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 29-07-2017, 16:35
Michael Foster Michael Foster is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 43
Default

Hi Alex
I would say that the Jacobs Douwe Egberts processing plant in Banbury and the King Sutton Silo’s a couple of miles downstream have to be the number 1 culprits. I did raise this in the previous thread on this subject a couple of years ago.
The said processing plant obviously dont give a sh*t about the air quality and stink adjacent to their plant, which I have to inhale most mornings while dropping intoTesco’s across the road, so I don’t think they would be to worried about what the waste products at the Silo’s are doing to the Cherwell.
We noticed in the early to mid 90s that there was a slight tinge in the water developing , which seemed to get progessively worse season by season. I have a friend in Kings Sutton who worked at the Silo’s for a few years, I shall have a word with him. Apparrently a lot of the waste is still stacked up outside close to the river,which causes a lot of leakage. There doesn’t seem to be a problem upstream from here, only downstream!!
The problem is definately worse in the summer. Chemistry wasn’t my best subject at school, but could the higher water temps and absorbancy, coupled with the reduced flow rates have something to do with it.
I fished the Cherwell after christmas, you would think it was a different river, it looked in superb condition, colour and flow. The crayfish were extremely active in the cold weather and so were the otters, the bank was littered with loads of crunched up crays and piles of otter spraints. Our furry friends do occasionally have their good uses!
Back to Jacobs Douwe Egberts. They have invested millions in that plant in the last few years and are probably Banbury’s biggest employer, perhaps the EA have been persuaded to turn a blind eye to their waste and environmental procedures!!! Which might explain why the EA never get back to you. Couldn’t imagine the residents Virginia Water having to put up with that stink every day!!!
Time for a coffee now, always Douwe Egberts by the way, and £2 a jar cheaper at PoundStretcher in Witney.
Mick
I’ll drop you a PM Alex
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 30-07-2017, 09:51
Kevin Plaskitt Kevin Plaskitt is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Leighton Buzzard Beds
Posts: 36
Default

I fish the Cherwell at Water Eaton. The local farmer believes it is the coffee plant that colours the water.

There used to be a healthy population of Barbel but since the 2007 floods they have disappeared. Plenty of chub though and to good sizes.

It is still a lovely river to fish.

Kevin
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 30-07-2017, 10:46
Alex Gowney's Avatar
Alex Gowney Alex Gowney is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Banbury
Posts: 1,631
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Swaby View Post
Alex, you say that in the Winter its the colour it should be, that nice green colour so that would rule out a number of things.Do you think it could be dying off algae(increased in volume by farm fertilisers etc) from the canal system,being flushed into the river.The boat traffic would be heavy in the spring and summer compared to winter.Most canal systems go crystal clear in winter.My Family pond has a bottom drain and you would not believe the filth/smell that comes out every couple of days i pull it.The algae seems to dye off completly to a brown filth every time we get a couple of rainy days,then regrows with the Sunny days.In the winter the bottom drain runs clear,the algae does not grow in the winter.I used to fish at Shipton in the days when the river was alive with quality fish,sounds so sad.
Good points Mark and I think they do contribute to the problem. In winter it looks like the Cherwell of old, in summer it's a disgrace.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 30-07-2017, 10:52
Alex Gowney's Avatar
Alex Gowney Alex Gowney is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Banbury
Posts: 1,631
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Foster View Post
Hi Alex
I would say that the Jacobs Douwe Egberts processing plant in Banbury and the King Sutton Silo’s a couple of miles downstream have to be the number 1 culprits. I did raise this in the previous thread on this subject a couple of years ago.
The said processing plant obviously dont give a sh*t about the air quality and stink adjacent to their plant, which I have to inhale most mornings while dropping intoTesco’s across the road, so I don’t think they would be to worried about what the waste products at the Silo’s are doing to the Cherwell.
We noticed in the early to mid 90s that there was a slight tinge in the water developing , which seemed to get progessively worse season by season. I have a friend in Kings Sutton who worked at the Silo’s for a few years, I shall have a word with him. Apparrently a lot of the waste is still stacked up outside close to the river,which causes a lot of leakage. There doesn’t seem to be a problem upstream from here, only downstream!!
The problem is definately worse in the summer. Chemistry wasn’t my best subject at school, but could the higher water temps and absorbancy, coupled with the reduced flow rates have something to do with it.
I fished the Cherwell after christmas, you would think it was a different river, it looked in superb condition, colour and flow. The crayfish were extremely active in the cold weather and so were the otters, the bank was littered with loads of crunched up crays and piles of otter spraints. Our furry friends do occasionally have their good uses!
Back to Jacobs Douwe Egberts. They have invested millions in that plant in the last few years and are probably Banbury’s biggest employer, perhaps the EA have been persuaded to turn a blind eye to their waste and environmental procedures!!! Which might explain why the EA never get back to you. Couldn’t imagine the residents Virginia Water having to put up with that stink every day!!!
Time for a coffee now, always Douwe Egberts by the way, and £2 a jar cheaper at PoundStretcher in Witney.
Mick
I’ll drop you a PM Alex
I agree Mike, it's the silos at Kings Sutton that are my main suspects. The Banbury processing plant which was known as GF has history of polluting the river. It was responsible for a big fish kill back in the early 80s that killed a lot of fish including some very big chub and barbel. I suppose, as Mark commented, that in winter increased flows clear it quicker. But it has got worse in the past few years. Interesting you say about the tinge of colour that was starting to appear through the 80s and 90s, I well remember taking a walk along the river at Steeple Aston in 1997 and it was the colour of beer.Still plenty of fish about though and you could still see them. I am also still surprised at the lack of caryfish activity this past week, maybe my bait is so poor even they don't want it
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 30-07-2017, 10:54
Alex Gowney's Avatar
Alex Gowney Alex Gowney is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Banbury
Posts: 1,631
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin Plaskitt View Post
I fish the Cherwell at Water Eaton. The local farmer believes it is the coffee plant that colours the water.

There used to be a healthy population of Barbel but since the 2007 floods they have disappeared. Plenty of chub though and to good sizes.

It is still a lovely river to fish.

Kevin
Yes, the barbel seem to be a thing of the past now Kevin, sadly. Those floods affected 90% of the countries rivers it seems, with no real answer as to why.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 30-07-2017, 12:33
Mark Swaby Mark Swaby is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Ruislip
Posts: 587
Default

Looking at the map the coffee plant is near to the Canal and there looks to be a stream that goes through the factory towards the canal,could 30 plus years of coffee waste going into the canal from that stream be a cause.The stain would have been distributed by the boats down the length of the canal and stirred up in the summer.When the boats are not running in the winter, the canal goes clear and the river would then run clean?.We used to fish Shipton in the 80's/90's and the canal was rarely used in the winter. If it was the silos would the same stain not be there in the winter,unless they go unused in winter.Rivers have been low for years and should the stain not be there with low flow in winter.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 30-07-2017, 13:13
Dave Taylor's Avatar
Dave Taylor Dave Taylor is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: West Parley
Posts: 1,457
Default

Put this up a few years ago when topic was raised.....
http://www.banburyguardian.co.uk/new...well-1-5304709
If you search through endless scanned online PDF River Authority management plans going back over 20 years, somewhere you will find reference to the then, Kraft coffee plant, which points out that the waste product was difficult to remove before entering the river but was thought not to provide a threat.

Marks comments re boat traffic turbidity were also mentioned as well as the Cherwell being extremely susceptible to eutrophic algae blooms.
Sounds like not much has changed.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 30-07-2017, 19:11
Alex Gowney's Avatar
Alex Gowney Alex Gowney is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Banbury
Posts: 1,631
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Taylor View Post
Put this up a few years ago when topic was raised.....
http://www.banburyguardian.co.uk/new...well-1-5304709
If you search through endless scanned online PDF River Authority management plans going back over 20 years, somewhere you will find reference to the then, Kraft coffee plant, which points out that the waste product was difficult to remove before entering the river but was thought not to provide a threat.

Marks comments re boat traffic turbidity were also mentioned as well as the Cherwell being extremely susceptible to eutrophic algae blooms.
Sounds like not much has changed.
Sadly it has changed Dave, for the worse It often carried a dark tinge but the colour these days is how it used to be after a weeks rain.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 31-07-2017, 09:28
Jason Bean Jason Bean is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 378
Default

Morning guys...while since I last posted but I'll give my take on the Cherwell.

The river is just down the road from me in Kidlington and I fish it nearly every week and walk it everyday with my dog. There's no doubting it has changed a lot in the last 30 years but I've only ever known it for the last 15 and to be honest its not that bad a small river.

Regarding the colour it carries now I don't think there is a definitive answer, well at least the EA can't give us one as it contradicts the way they allow the river to be used as a resource.

What you have to look at is what as changed that can effect the colour of the river and when you do its hardly surprising its ended up this way. thing is not allowing it to get any worst, which could possibly happen.

A few years back me and CG74...(remember him Terry) looked in to this in great depth, we spent a lot of time corresponding with the EA and the canals and rivers trust and ultimately Cherwell district council.

This was all brought about by the planning of an extremely large marina (160 plus births) at Yarnton on the Oxford canal. Now being a match angler as well I fish the canal a lot around oxford and I'm fully aware of the heavy traffic it suffers from and it has been getting worst for the last 20 years.

So we looked at the planning and knew it only meant one thing...more boats on the canal, more lock movements and a lot less water in the river...basically what little water there is can go 2 ways river or canal. A small group of us fought the planning despite EA approval and canals and rivers trust backing. We went right to the top of the canals and rivers trust hydrology and what we heard rom them was basically stuff you...we can do it so we will, which is based on ancient industrial rights , not leisure needs.

So we pressured the EA to back us and eventually the fisheries did, this was based on the WFD classification of the river which meant it was already stressed with low summer flows and the marina would make it worst. The EA fair does to them wrote a letter to Cherwell district council and stated that the river cannot keep having water taken out of it to ascertain the WFD status as "good". So an EU directive being stuck to was our only chance, the council were starting to see it that way and with the EA backing the planning application was removed. The Field is now solar panels!

What did we take from this? well basically its a bit late, Marinas have been built all through the oxford canal and the boat traffic is very heavy in the summer months. The commercial interests of using the canal were left unchecked/unnoticed for too long and the loser was the Cherwell. Thing is all these marina's could have been stopped as its clear the council planners would have to back the EA regarding the WFD classification of the river.

I think the lack of water in the summer is the major part that has highlighted the poor farming practices that now go on through the valley. Arable farming as increased greatly and the fertilizers used are ultimately flowing into the river causing the algae blooms/eutrophication.

like I said I still fish the river regularly and last year I was fortunate to catch 4 barbel up to 8lb 12oz, I know these are most likely stockies from approx. 6/7 years ago but it shows they can survive in the river still, just probably never spawn successfully with the state it's in know.

On the plus side, like Alex said...where are the crayfish, every where I go locally there seems to be very few of them...hope that continues!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:17.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.