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  #21  
Old 07-10-2017, 18:33
Mike Hodgkiss Mike Hodgkiss is offline
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Originally Posted by Joe Fletcher View Post
If we as anglers are concerned about the predation of our fish stocks on our rivers and lakes ? We talk about Otters , Cormorants and Goosander's and how they are having a impact on our fish stocks .

One predator that has not been talked about that was introduced illegally many years ago to our rivers and waterways is the Zander .

I assume Zander just like Otters , Cormorants and Goosander are having a impact on our fish stocks .

So the question I ask is . If we as anglers are concerned about the impact of Otters ,Goosanders and Cormorants are having on fish stocks . Then why are illegally stocked non native Zander that were introduced many years ago not on the list of predators that we as anglers should be concerned about ?
Joe , a fair few of The UK's rivers were illegally stocked with barbel , bet they eat a few fish eggs , but they are a native species so we can let them off, and as for them pesky kingfishers , how many fish do they eat a day ? To be serious, I recall back in 70's a lot of fuss about Zander and the threat they posed to indigenous species however it would seem that they didn't decimate the indigenous fish population so they are safe now .Catfish , have they had an negative impact on indigenous species ?

One or two folks have got there danders up about this predator survey , I still feel that the issue is not identifying the problem but doing something about it in terms of redressing the balance
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  #22  
Old 07-10-2017, 18:40
Jason Bean Jason Bean is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Fletcher View Post
If we as anglers are concerned about the predation of our fish stocks on our rivers and lakes ? We talk about Otters , Cormorants and Goosander's and how they are having a impact on our fish stocks .

One predator that has not been talked about that was introduced illegally many years ago to our rivers and waterways is the Zander .

I assume Zander just like Otters , Cormorants and Goosander are having a impact on our fish stocks .

So the question I ask is . If we as anglers are concerned about the impact of Otters ,Goosanders and Cormorants are having on fish stocks . Then why are illegally stocked non native Zander that were introduced many years ago not on the list of predators that we as anglers should be concerned about ?
You can add catfish to that Joe...plenty of them swimming around. Any specimen guy catching one out of a river would weigh it, photograph and be very happy. They would not turn round and say this is an invasive species and is eating my big barbel and chub so I'll knock it on the head. There lies the hypocrisy.
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  #23  
Old 07-10-2017, 18:44
Jason Bean Jason Bean is offline
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Mike...beat me to the catfish, just got back from a long hard day on the upper Thames
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  #24  
Old 07-10-2017, 18:52
Jason Bean Jason Bean is offline
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Originally Posted by Howard Cooke View Post
Wasn't it generally believed that at speeds of over 30 mph people would die- from suffocation or something. Its a good job Mr Ford and others didn't listen to that background noise.

I'm sorry Jason but I just don't see the merit in demolishing an initiative which doesn't appear to have any downside. I am not sure I would class submissions as "hearsay" although I sort of get where you are coming from. We have to apply a bit fo faith and trust that the majority of people would submit something that is accurate without distortion that suited a particular agenda. That's why the more anglers that engage and do so over a long period of time, the more any such distortions are smoothed out. As I said previously, the value isn't necessarily in a snapshot view of predation-its' changes over time. The entire debate around fish stock levels/the state of our rivers is certainly starved of the oxygen of meaningful scientific analysis. But there is no either or here- data derived from this sort of initiative can happily run in parallel to scientific analysis and help inform the debate.

It takes no time at all to submit something-I did it last week after encountering a crayfish and whilst you and others may feel its pointless, I actually felt like I was helping a bit- contributing in some small way to a cause that all anglers should be united over. I have no idea ultimately what value will be derived from this work. But I am more than happy to support an angler who is prepared to do something practical and of course everyone has the choice to do the same or ignore it. Its just a bit depressing when initiatives such as this get the "what's the point" treatment.

I don't know how many anglers will be arsed to do the survey, and in terms of apathetic anglers, aren't you simply committing the same crime in your response to this?
Howard..I'm really not having a go at the lads doing it or the effort they are putting in and I hope so thing comes of it.

The website is informative and shines a light on predation and other angling problems. But after reading through it twice I still come to the conclusion of what's the point? In that I mean it's aim seems disjointed, unclear and unacheivable....and in all honesty 15 years too late.
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  #25  
Old 07-10-2017, 20:56
Jason Bean Jason Bean is offline
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And now we have cormorant watch 2

http://www.anglingtrust.net/news.asp...ing+Trust+News
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  #26  
Old 08-10-2017, 09:48
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Bobby Baker Bobby Baker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Fletcher View Post
If we as anglers are concerned about the predation of our fish stocks on our rivers and lakes ? We talk about Otters , Cormorants and Goosander's and how they are having a impact on our fish stocks .

One predator that has not been talked about that was introduced illegally many years ago to our rivers and waterways is the Zander .

I assume Zander just like Otters , Cormorants and Goosander are having a impact on our fish stocks .

So the question I ask is . If we as anglers are concerned about the impact of Otters ,Goosanders and Cormorants are having on fish stocks . Then why are illegally stocked non native Zander that were introduced many years ago not on the list of predators that we as anglers should be concerned about ?

Arrrr, but, that one pulls back on rod and line, Joe - so it's fine
I do like Paul's angle and how he's presenting himself, the project etc. But coupled with the divisive, horrendous guff coming out of certain anglers and groups, I do fear no good will come of it.
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  #27  
Old 08-10-2017, 10:49
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Shaun Nurse Shaun Nurse is offline
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I`m sure no ill will come of it either BB..
Firstly I`d like to say a huge THANKS to all those who do take the time out to contribute their observations (now and over the past years), they are being logged and do form a basis of factual actual information from the riverbank, which believe it or not, is more than many who are higher up in the "say so" department, actually have. Scientists and researchers need some of the wealth of knowledge gathered from such studies. It is from such things that the Angling trust were able to make authorities aware of the Cormorant problem in the first place and get the extra rights which they have done. and this is not finished and the predation page is going towards helping further action regarding these and the other predators. The site provides a good deal of information and help for how to manage the various predation issues, this may not be useful or interesting to some individuals directly, but can be very helpful for others, and their various angling clubs etc.
I`m really not sure what there is to question....? It is a collection of unique information and data, which can only be a positive, it costs nothing but a few moments of time to report, and of course (as mentioned above) you are not obliged to help your fellow man/angling community and natural environment at large, but if you can it is welcomed. If you cannot, well need you throw negativity at it? Probably not.
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  #28  
Old 08-10-2017, 12:20
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Bobby Baker Bobby Baker is offline
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Ah mate, you'll get used to questioning and criticism! Grow numb to it possibly 😁 Especially when presenting facts and figures. God 'elp you both. I wish you all the best with it. 👍
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  #29  
Old 08-10-2017, 15:40
James Anderson James Anderson is offline
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Surely the best thing to do is call it an otter survey, because in reality that's all it is??
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  #30  
Old 08-10-2017, 16:05
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Joe Fletcher Joe Fletcher is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Bean View Post
You can add catfish to that Joe...plenty of them swimming around. Any specimen guy catching one out of a river would weigh it, photograph and be very happy. They would not turn round and say this is an invasive species and is eating my big barbel and chub so I'll knock it on the head. There lies the hypocrisy.
As you say Jason their lies the hypocrisy . We moan and complain when Otters were reintroduced to our rivers and then turn a blind eye when it comes to non native invasive species like Zander and Catfish .

I remember a couple of years ago a very large Catfish was caught by some one fishing for Barbel at Ripple on the Lower Severn . He weighed it and took photos and returned it .
Had he of culled it and not returned it, anglers would of been up in arms about it

Where ever man has stepped forth on this planet he has interfered with nature for his own personal gain
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